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Question and Answer - View Question

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Here is Ron Gabel's answer to question number 6460

Question:

Hello Again: Since Ron did such a great job (as usual) on naming the Colt Baby Dragoon, I have another weird one for him. It is a Colt, 44 Caliber Percussion and has a 5 inch octagon barrel. The top flat of the barrel is marked "ADDRESS SAM (little capital L) COLT HARTFORD CT.", the cylinder is engraved with the "Texas Naval Battle Scene" and has the "COLT'S PATENT" on the left frame. Serial Number of 77221 matches in seven places, including on the frame under the grips and on the cylinder pin - the wedge is not numbered. The grips are of one piece Walnut with no visible markings. The other odd thing is "The entire frame, trigger guard, and backstrap are Solid Brass". This Colt looks old, weights approximately 2 pounds, and is a little over ten inches in total length. I have been told by everyone that Colt did not make a 44 Caliber Percussion with an Octagon Barrel. As well, I have been advised that Colt did not make a Brass Frame Revolver. However, I have found by research, that in 1852 the U.S. Navy ordered and received Brass Framed Revolvers from Colt. This Colt definitely does not look or feel like any fake or reproduction that I have seen, and the condition is the same all over. It is a beautiful revolver and looks like the Colt 1851 Navy with the rounded trigger guard and a shorter barrel. I would greatly appreciate any insight that you could offer on this for me, and would gladly forward photos if necessary. Thanks and Best Regards Leo Wheatley

Answer:

The barrel markings of your revolver and the cylinder scene are correct for the early Colt Navy revolver (serial number range #74,000 to #101,000). The odd things about your revolver are the 44 caliber and the brass frame. The caliber listed for this revolver is 36 with a few experimental pistols produced in 40 caliber (no mention of 44). The standard barrel length was 7 1/2 inches octagon but lengths from 5 to 12 inches were available on special order. I have not seen the historical reference to brass framed revolvers, but given that information your revolver could be an authentic "special order". Suggest you obtain authentication from someone like R.L. Wilson or some other Colt expert.

Submitted By: Leo Wheatley On: 5/12/2004 12:45:39 PM

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